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Book Review: Too Much Information…; Dave Gorman | Michael Talbot

Titillation meets Moral Opprobrium.

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Or:

Phwoar, look at the legs on that. How disgusting!

Dave Gorman, summing up UK gutter rag publication The Daily Mail, in one glorious sentence. I feel this sentence balances out Daves’ complaints about proper books going away, a sentiment that pops up more than once in said book.

Which is, of course, available as an eBook. Said eBook was originally published with one glorious typo early in the book, that was almost worth the purchase price alone.

The Reviews of the new Kindle Voyage are starting to emerge, now the embargo is over.

They seem to be backing up my initial thoughts when it was unveiled - a nice upgrade to the previous model, but not worth upgrading if you’ve got a recent [i.e. two, possibly three years] model.

I still think the design of the back of the unit looks weird; it’s akin to the original model, which looked like a 90s lab prototype.

I want a book by someone who’s taller than JK Rowling.

Type that exact phrase into Amazon.co.uk and you’ll get a quite amusing result.

I didn’t get a chance to reply to your comment from yesterday, so I’ve joined ‘em together, using the visual magic that is MSPaint.
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The whole touchy smelly feely “thing” I get - well, actually I don’t, but I get that it’ll pop up in certain videos. A to Z Book Surveys; Would you Rather type videos? It’s par for the course. It just seems bizarre when people address it in the middle of a book review.
Sometimes format differences are warranted in reviews - I’m contemplating starting House of Leaves on the 31st - If I complete it, and review it, then the format will be addressed, for the simple fact you can’t read the book in digital form, due to the way the book is presented - the typography can’t realistically be replicated in eInk or ePaper - it’s possible, I guess on a tablet, but even then it’d be difficult.
- - - 
Gah! Aside from a typo in the description, I knew there was something I’d missed in the review. Generally speaking when I’m writing ‘em up, I have a line or two with key words that reference certain parts of the book - so for that book it would have included.

The Cronos Club / [Locations, Dates]

etc. etc. I also had Life after Life, but deleted it without reference, as I wasn’t entirely sure why I’d included it.
I’ll have to bump Life after Life up the reading list, and make sure to include a backwards reference to …Harry August at somepoint.

I didn’t get a chance to reply to your comment from yesterday, so I’ve joined ‘em together, using the visual magic that is MSPaint.

-

The whole touchy smelly feely “thing” I get - well, actually I don’t, but I get that it’ll pop up in certain videos. A to Z Book Surveys; Would you Rather type videos? It’s par for the course. It just seems bizarre when people address it in the middle of a book review.

Sometimes format differences are warranted in reviews - I’m contemplating starting House of Leaves on the 31st - If I complete it, and review it, then the format will be addressed, for the simple fact you can’t read the book in digital form, due to the way the book is presented - the typography can’t realistically be replicated in eInk or ePaper - it’s possible, I guess on a tablet, but even then it’d be difficult.

- - - 

Gah! Aside from a typo in the description, I knew there was something I’d missed in the review. Generally speaking when I’m writing ‘em up, I have a line or two with key words that reference certain parts of the book - so for that book it would have included.

The Cronos Club / [Locations, Dates]

etc. etc. I also had Life after Life, but deleted it without reference, as I wasn’t entirely sure why I’d included it.

I’ll have to bump Life after Life up the reading list, and make sure to include a backwards reference to …Harry August at somepoint.


Tyger Tyger, burning bright,  In the Forests of the Night.

I’m rummaging through my copy of Too Much Information… by Dave Gorman, to pick out a few choice bits ‘n’ pieces for a review.  Whist not a highlight, nor something that’ll appear in the review, I did find it a funny co-incidence that William Blakes’ “The Tyger" caught my eye, just a few hours after Doctor Who ends with a teaser trailer for the next episode - "In the Forest of the Night"
[On a side note, I’d forgotten how much of a pain it is to photograph a page of text. Also, ebook highlighting is waaaay easier for reviewing books I really will have to revert back to the old notepad with notes routine, when it comes to physical books.]

Tyger Tyger, burning bright,  In the Forests of the Night.

I’m rummaging through my copy of Too Much Information… by Dave Gorman, to pick out a few choice bits ‘n’ pieces for a review.  Whist not a highlight, nor something that’ll appear in the review, I did find it a funny co-incidence that William Blakes’ “The Tyger" caught my eye, just a few hours after Doctor Who ends with a teaser trailer for the next episode - "In the Forest of the Night"

[On a side note, I’d forgotten how much of a pain it is to photograph a page of text. Also, ebook highlighting is waaaay easier for reviewing books I really will have to revert back to the old notepad with notes routine, when it comes to physical books.]

From the preview of next weeks’ episode of Doctor Who, shown at the end of Flatline.
tumblr will shrink the image down; here’s the imgur link to the full HD version. It seems - for whatever reason, they took a bus with a promotional banner for The Maze Runner [“A-Maze-Ing Entertainment”], removed the actual photo from the film, and put Capaldi and Coleman over it.
As for why? Who knows?

From the preview of next weeks’ episode of Doctor Who, shown at the end of Flatline.

tumblr will shrink the image down; here’s the imgur link to the full HD version. It seems - for whatever reason, they took a bus with a promotional banner for The Maze Runner [“A-Maze-Ing Entertainment”], removed the actual photo from the film, and put Capaldi and Coleman over it.

As for why? Who knows?

This season of Doctor Who remains sooooo inconsistent when it comes to the writing.

The same series that gives us The Doctor and Clara go play with Robin Hood; and The Doctor and Clara go crash onto the Moon, also produced Listen and Flatline

Book Review: The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August; Claire North | Michael Talbot

No matter what he does or the decisions he makes, ever time Harry dies, he always returns to where he began, a child with all the knowledge of a life lived a dozen times before. Nothing ever changes – until now.

As Harry nears the end of his eleventh life, a little girl appears at his bedside, ‘I nearly missed you, Doctor August,’ she says. ‘I need to send a message.’

This is the story of what Harry does next, and what he did before, and how he tries to save a past he cannot change and a future he cannot allow.

It’s been a while, so go easy. Also the site is still in a state of flux, so there might be weird formatting glitches if you navigate outside of the linked review.

Good News! My dental crown stopped wobbling around in the socket.

Bad News: It fell out.

[It’s now safely packaged away, ready to take to the dentist with me].